retour article original

vendredi 9 décembre 2016
Vous êtes ici Accueil Informations internationales Asie Proche Orient
counterpunch, 24 mars 2016

Proche Orient : A History of Silencing Israeli Army Whistleblowers, From 1948 Until Today

par Jonathan COOK


A Palestinian woman walks next to the remains of her home after it was demolished by Israeli bulldozers in the village of Khirbet al-Halawah, south of the West Bank city of Hebron, on 2 February 2016. Israeli forces demolished approximately two dozen buildings the area, leaving several families homeless. The area was declared a military zone in the 1970s and for decades Israel has tried to force out Palestinian residents

One might expect that only historians would care to revisit the 1948 war that created Israel. And yet the debate about what constitutes truth and myth from that period still provokes raw emotions.


Israel

Much rests on how those events are reconstructed, not least because the shock waves have yet to subside. Israelis fear, and Palestinians crave, a clearer picture of the past because it would powerfully illuminate the present. It might also influence the international community’s proposed solutions for the conflict.

That is why the unearthing of an Israeli soldier’s letter from 1948 detailing what was probably the war’s worst massacre –one long buried by Israel– is of more than historical significance.

It comes as Moshe Yaalon, the defence minister, this week accused Breaking the Silence, an Israeli organisation that exposes military abuses, of “treason” for collecting evidence from the army’s current whistle-blowers.

Western understandings of the 1948 war –what Palestinians term their Nakba, or catastrophe– are dominated by an enduring Israeli narrative. Israel’s army, it is said, abided by a strict moral code. Palestinians left not because of Israel’s actions but on the orders of Arab leaders.

In this rendering, the Palestinians’ mass dispossession was the fault of the Arab world –and a solution for the millions of today’s refugees lies with their host countries.

Palestinians in Gaza City protest in solidarity with hunger-striking journalist Muhammad al-Qiq, held without charge or trial by Israel, 2 February 2016

For decades Israel’s chief concession to the truth was an admission that a massacre took place just outside Jerusalem, at Deir Yassin.

Israel claimed the atrocity was the exception that proved the rule : a rogue militia killed more than 100 villagers, violating Israel’s ethical codes in the chaotic weeks before statehood was declared.

Palestinians have always known of dozens of other large massacres of civilians from 1948 carried out by the Israeli army. The barbarity, they say, was intended to terrorise the native population into flight. This account puts responsibility on Israel for taking the refugees back.

But history is written by the victor.

In recent decades a few brave Israeli scholars have chipped away at the official facade. In the late 1990s a Haifa University student collected testimonies from former soldiers confirming that over 200 Palestinians had been massacred at Tantura, south of Haifa. After the findings were made public, he was pilloried and stripped of his degree.

A decade ago, the historian Ilan Pappe wrote a groundbreaking book, The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, arguing that massacres like the one at Tantura were exploited to drive out Palestinians. He and others noted the suggestive titles of military operations such as “Broom” and soldiers’ orders to “clean” areas.

Pappe now lives in academic exile in the UK.

The biggest obstacle to shifting Israeli and western perceptions of 1948 has been the lack of a clear paper trail connecting the political leadership to the massacres. Israel locked away bundles of documentation precisely not to jeopardise the official narrative.

But things are changing slowly.

Israeli Border Police arrest an Israeli member of Combatants for Peace during a protest against the occupation on the Jerusalem-Hebron highway in full view of Israeli settlers, Beit Jala, West Bank, 5 February 2016

Last year a key deception was punctured : that Israel urged many of the war’s 750000 Palestinian refugees to return. In a letter to Haifa’s leaders shortly after the city’s Palestinians were expelled, David Ben Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister, demanded that any return be barred.

Now another letter, located by Israeli historian Yair Auron and published last week for the first time in English by the Haaretz newspaper, trashes the idea of an ethical Israel army.

Written by Shabtai Kaplan, a soldier and journalist, the letter confirms long-held suspicions of a massacre –one that dwarfs Deir Yassin– at Dawaymeh, near Hebron. Soldiers executed hundreds of men, women and children who offered no resistance.

The massacre, near the end of the war, was carried out by elite troops under the command of Yitzhak Sadeh. He developed the Israeli army’s famous doctrine of “purity of arms”.

Kaplan argues that the Dawaymeh massacre was part of “a system of expulsion and destruction”, with a clear goal : “The fewer Arabs who remain, the better”.

Kaplan’s letter was consigned to the vaults, as were so many other documents from 1948 that officials considered too damaging.

Nearly seven decades later, in an age of 24-hour news and social media, Israel is still desperately trying to conceal its darkest episodes by bullying the army’s current whistle-blowers.

Last week Benjamin Netanyahu’s government launched an investigation into Breaking the Silence. On Sunday Netanyau called the collection of soldiers’ testimonies “intolerable”, indicating that he may try to ban the group.

It is hard not to see parallels between the cover-ups of 1948 and those of today. Breaking the Silence’s disclosures, especially those relating to Israel’s series of attacks on Gaza, each of which has left hundreds of civilians dead, similarly give the lie to the army’s continuing claims of ethical behaviour.

In his 1948 letter, Kaplan observed of the failure by the political leadership to hold anyone to account for the massacres : “Inaction is in itself encouragement”.

Israel’s politicians hoped then that the Palestinians could be quickly terrorised from their lands. Decades later, the atrocities continue –and to the same end. But Israel must face facts : the days when such systematic brutality could be kept under wraps are now over.

Jonathan COOK

Fighters with the Qassam Brigades, the armed wing of Hamas, carry the body of their comrade Marwan Maarouf, 27, during his funeral in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, on 9 February 2016. Maarouf died when a tunnel collapsed in the Gaza Strip, Hamas said, in the fourth such incident over the past few weeks, killing more than 10 fighters

Liens liés a l'article.counterpunch

AUTEURS 

  • Jonathan COOK

  • Accueil

    éditeur : Frank Brunner | ouverture : 11 novembre 2000 | reproduction autorisée en citant la source