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mardi 25 octobre 2016
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The Intercept, 25 juin 2016

Honduras : US State Department Turns Blind Eye to Evidence of Military’s Activist Kill List

par Alex EMMONS

Soldiers and policemen are deployed in Tegucigalpa, next to a blockade

State Department spokesperson John Kirby on Wednesday [June 22, 2016] repeatedly denied (1) that the government of Honduras kills its own citizens, saying more than a dozen times that he has not heard “credible evidence” of “deaths ordered by the military”.


His comments came in the wake of a high-profile assassination of Honduran native-rights activist Berta Cáceres (2) in March, and a report (3) in the Guardian that a high-level deserter from the Honduran army said he is “100 percent certain that Berta Cáceres was killed by the [Honduran] army”. The deserter explained that Cáceres’s name and picture appeared on a kill list including “dozens of social and environmental activists”, which had been distributed to two elite, U.S.-trained units.

Berta Cáceres

Since Honduras’s right-wing regime seized power in a coup in 2009, media and human rights organizations have compiled overwhelming evidence of Honduran military and police violence.

Kirby said he was aware of “media reports alleging the existence of a Honduran activist hit list”, but noted that “at this time, there’s no specific, credible allegations of gross violations of human rights that exists in this or any other case involving the security forces that receive U.S. government assistance”.

John Kirby

Kirby’s comments were even at odds with the State Department’s own human rights reports (4) on Honduras, which for the last two years have referred to “unlawful and arbitrary killings and other criminal activities by members of the security forces”.

The U.S. maintains a very close relationship with Honduran military. Since a military coup (5) deposed leftist President Manuel Zelaya in 2009, the United States has provided nearly $200 million (6) in military aid to the Central American nation. The U.S. also maintains a network (7) of at least seven military bases in Honduras, which house a permanent force of more than 600 special operations troops. In February, the Wall Street Journal published a video (8) showing American forces teaching Honduran forces how to conduct night raids.

Manuel Zelaya

In 2009, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton played a central role in legitimizing the new coup regime. While President Obama initially called (9) Zelaya’s ouster “illegal” and said it would set a “terrible precedent”, Clinton refused to call it a military coup, and aid continued to flow. She also pushed for a sham election (10) to “render the question of Zelaya moot”, according to Clinton’s memoir –which was later scrubbed (11) of references to Honduras during her presidential campaign.

Officially linking U.S.-backed Honduran forces with human rights violation would trigger legally-required reductions in aid –in addition to putting the State Department in the uncomfortable position of criticizing a client state, and casting doubt on Clinton’s wisdom in backing the coup.

After The Intercept asked Kirby to respond to the report that the U.S. trained Cáceres’s killers, he repeatedly denied the existence of “specific, credible allegations”.

After other reporters joined in the questioning, Kirby expressed frustration that he had repeat that there was “no credible evidence” of state murders more than a dozen times. “The reason you’re being asked to repeat it is because it’s kind of hard to believe”, said Associated Press diplomatic correspondent Matt Lee.

Watch the video :

State Department won’t comment on possible U.S.-trained Honduran hitmen

Kirby also refused to outline the steps the U.S. was taking to follow up on the allegation. He insisted that the State Department took the report “seriously”, but admitted that he was “unaware” of any meetings between the Department and Honduran activists, and that the department had not followed up with The Guardian (12).

CNN’s Elise Labott asked : “Have you been looking for evidence or you’re just waiting for it to fall into your lap, in which case you would launch an investigation ?” Kirby insisted it was the former.

The murder of Cáceres –a renowned environmental and native rights activist– drew international condemnation (13) and prompted a U.N.-supported (14) investigation. Cáceres won the prestigious Goldman Prize (15) in 2015 for overcoming death threats and organizing opposition to the Agua Zarca dam –stopping the internationally bankrolled hydroelectric project that threatened the land and livelihood of the native Lenca people.

Since 2009, Honduras has seen a sharp rise in political violence. By 2012, Honduran security forces had assassinated more than 300 people, including 34 opposition leaders and 13 journalists, according to Honduran human rights organizations. In the lead up to the 2013 elections, 18 candidates (16) from Zelaya’s party were murdered.

The A.P. reported (17) in 2013 that in Honduras’s largest two cities, there were more than 200 “formal complaints about death squad style killings” over the previous three years. Reports included the killing of people at military checkpoints (18), and even police assassination (19) of a top anti-drug government official.

In 2014, more than 100 members of Congress signed a letter (20) to Secretary of State John Kerry, raising concerns about “death-squad style killings by Honduran police” and urging him to abide by the Foreign Assistance Act, which prohibits aid to any military unit guilty of “gross violations of human rights”.

In the wake of Cáceres’s murder, Honduran human rights activists have traveled to D.C. to brief lawmakers (21) about the security situation. At a congressional briefing in April, Bertha Oliva, founder of the Committee of Relatives of the Disappeared in Honduras, told lawmakers that “it’s like going back to the past” and that “there are death squads in Honduras”. Oliva compared the situation to the 1980s, when the Reagan administration funded, armed, and trained (22) death squads which disappeared, tortured, and killed hundreds of citizens.

At the briefing on Wednesday, the A.P.’s Lee asked Kirby how much responsibility the U.S. would share if it were true that it had trained Honduran government death squads.

“We absolutely have a responsibility to … hold them to account for those human rights abuses, and we do do that”, said Kirby. “Are we going to blame ourselves for the specific human rights violations of another human being in that regard ? That’s a pretty difficult connection to make”.

While the State Department turns a blind eye to the Honduran government’s human rights record, Congress may restrict military aid on its own. Under appropriations laws, Congress can withhold 50 percent of its Honduras aid budgeted for the State Department. Last week, Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., also introduced the Berta Caceres Human Rights in Honduras Act (23), which would cut off all military and police aid until the government’s human rights record improves.

Dana Frank, a history professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a widely published expert on Honduras, called Kirby’s remarks “mindboggling”.

“What State is saying sounds exactly like the Reagan Administration, when the State Department denied vast horrors committed by Honduran security forces for years, only to be later exposed for having known all about them and suppressed the evidence”, said Frank. “This denial of any evidence is a scary and newly aggressive counterattack”.


Honduran police agents detain peasant leaders from Bajo Aguán at a protest in Tegucigalpa

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    éditeur : Frank Brunner | ouverture : 11 novembre 2000 | reproduction autorisée en citant la source